What is the role of women in new technologies?

The second edition of the Women in Business leadership meeting organized by the Africa CEO Forum kicked off on Monday. For the next two days, nearly 250 participants from 31 countries will discuss innovation and the role of women in new technologies. A highly dynamic sector with the development of artificial intelligence… which women must seize, explains Hajer Khader Bizri, deputy director of the Women in Business Initiative.  Women are under-represented in scientific fields and this poses a real problem because afterwards we have what is called a bias in innovation and we end up with biased innovations because they are tested and thought of only by men. So there is really this challenge of having more women who create algorithms, who are in the scientific fields so that the products and services that companies put on the market are adapted to the whole of humanity, said Hajer Khader Bizri, Deputy Director,... Read more

Burkinabe scientists attempt killing mosquitoes with spider venom

 Burkinabe scientists in one of the country’s village plagued by malarial mosquitoes, are conducting an experiment to test whether a fungus genetically-engineered to produce a toxin found in spider venom can provide a breakthrough in the worldwide fight against malaria, a deadly mosquito-borne disease that killed an estimated 435,000 people in 2017, according to the World Health Organization. “If we can find a solution against this disease which killed my child, other people we will thank god. They should do everything to eradicate this disease,” said Dramane Ouedraogo, a dedicated father that has visited his son’s grave every day since the two-year-old died of malaria, n the village of Soumousso. Brian Lovett, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Maryland leading the project said the idea is to target the mosquitoes using the natural characteristics of the fungus and spider venom.  The scientists have engineered the DNA of the Metarhizium pingshaense fungus... Read more

Trump Administration to LGBT Couples: Your ‘Out of Wedlock’ Kids Aren’t Citizens

Children of U.S. citizens are falling victim to a policy that de-recognizes their parents’ marriage—and strips them of their birthright citizenship No parent can ever be fully prepared for the arrival of a new baby. But when Roee and Adiel Kiviti brought home their newborn daughter Kessem two months ago, they figured that they were as ready as they could be. After all, they’d gone through the same process two years earlier with their son Lev, who, like Kessem, was born with the help of an egg donor and a gestational surrogate in Canada. “It was as straightforward as one can imagine,” Roee told The Daily Beast, recalling the ease of bringing Lev home in late 2016, the infant’s newly printed Canadian passport in hand, soon to be supplanted by an American one. But this February, when Kessem’s fathers contacted the U.S. consulate in Calgary to obtain a Consular Report... Read more

Boukary Sawadogo signed copies of his book, “African Film Studies: An Introduction” in New York

“African Film Studies: An Introduction”, the book, which is presented deeply the African cinema was launched in December 4, 2018 at Schomburg Center, in Harlem in a room that was became small as many people came to support the author, and understand better what African cinema is about. “The book is divided into seven chapters, which are themselves organized under three main parts: history, aesthetics, and criticism of African cinema,” said Boukary Sawadogo who authors the book and who is an assistant professor of cinema studies at City University of New York (City College). Mr. Sawadogo was praised by Dr. Jerry W. Carlson, professor and chair of Department of Media & Communication Arts, and who said he is the one the Department was looking for. He also said that Mr. Sawadogo has his full support. Focusing his speech on the African cinema, Mr. Sawadogo said that “the understanding and appreciation... Read more

Africa Investment Forum exceeds expectations, participants agree

The Africa Investment Forum (www.AfricaInvestmentForum.com) ended on a high note with the closing panel comprising heads of Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) unanimously lauding the unique initiative, calling it an exceptional gathering that “exceeded all expectations.” President of the African Development Bank (www.AfDB.org), Akinwumi Adesina told the more than 1,000 delegates, “The needle is shifting, pointing to the right direction, pointing to Africa. I am thankful for the investors, I am thankful for the confidence they have in Africa. Africa has grown up. Africa is not going to be developed by aid. It will be developed by investment and I think you are beginning to see it.¨ Participants from DFIs, institutional investors, sovereign wealth, equity and private sector CEOs from across the continent congregated in Johannesburg, South Africa to attend the first ever transaction-based Forum on the continent. At midday Friday, of 61 transactions valued at US$40.4 billion tabled for discussions... Read more

Le mariage est un contrat

Si vous êtes mariés sous un régime de biens communs ou si vous n’êtes pas encore mariés et que vous voulez vous mettre la corde au cou, il y a sans nul doute une facette de cet engagement que vous pouvez ignorer. A travers ces lignes Bérenger Ouédraogo nous en dit plus. Un contrat est une convention (c’est-à-dire on s’entend) par laquelle on s’engage à faire ou à ne pas faire quelque chose.  Dans le cas du mariage, on parle plus souvent d'alliance, d'où la bague d'alliance. Ce contrat doit être bilatéral, c’est-à-dire, les contractants s’engagent réciproquement, les uns envers les autres et de façon explicite pour éviter les suppositions. Les catholiques parlent de sacrement (qui veut dire « signe »), mais cela n’annule pas le caractère contractuel du mariage. Le contrat se vérifie et trouve sa véracité dans le consentement matrimonial libre des conjoints. Le Catéchisme de l’Église Catholique en son... Read more

Interview: “Prof Boukary Sawadogo is talking about his new and second book

By : Bazona Barnabé Bado

Do you like African cinema, or do you want to know better about it? You have the good news: “African Film Studies: An Introduction” is a book that will allow you to explore and understand Africa through the lenses of African filmmakers. Dr. Boukary Sawadogo the author of that new book through this interview is talking about the book he took three years to write.  African Film Studies: An Introduction is the title of your new book and the second one you’ve written. Yes, it was published by Routledge in late September 2018. My first book, Les Cinémas francophones ouest-africains, 1990-2005, was published by Harmattan in 2013. Why did you decide to write a book that deals specifically with African film? I realized there is a great need for a teaching and learning resource for African cinema. There are plenty of scholarly books on African cinema but almost no textbooks... Read more

L’ÂME SŒUR : MYTHE OU RÉALITÉ?

Aujourd’hui dans notre rubrique « Famille » Wendlassida A. Bérenger Ouédraogo qui,  dans son article sur le choix du conjoint, nous parle de « l’âme sœur ». Il s’interroge : l’âme sœur est – il un mythe ou une réalité ? A vous de décider. Très souvent, des gens ont de la peine à se trouver et à se choisir un conjoint. L’on dit communément son âme sœur ou sa moitié. Ce peut être un mythe ou une réalité. De ces deux points de vue dépend notre attitude.           L’âme sœur vue comme un mythe. Vous allez rechercher le prince charmant, l’homme ou la femme idéal(e) qui serait uniquement créé pour vous et serait quelque part en attente d’être retrouvé(e). Selon le mythe, il existerait un être, juste pour vous, dont vous allez tomber amoureux instantanément. La théorie de l’âme sœur se trouve dans « le Bouquet de Platon ». Selon Platon, les êtres humains, à... Read more

A bloodless malaria test by a young Ugandan inventor won Africa’s top engineering prize  

  The $33,000 Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation has been awardedto a 24-year old Ugandan engineer for his invention of a bloodless malaria test. Before now, small blood samples taken from suspected patients in hospitals or pharmacies were used to test for malaria but with Matibabu, the device developed by Brian Gitta and his team, there is no need for pricking. When a person is infected, the malaria parasite takes over a vacuole of the red blood cells and significantly remodels it. For Matibabu to work, it is clipped onto a person’s finger and using light and magnetism, a red beam of light scans the finger for changes in colour, shape and concentration of the red blood cells. A result is produced within a minute and sent to a mobile phone linked to the device. Matibabu (Swahili for ‘treatment’) is low cost, reusable and because the procedure is non-invasive, does not require specialist training. Malaria alone... Read more

Imagine Africa with one language, and one currency !

By : Barnabé Bazona Bado

How powerful would be Africa, the continent of 54 countries, and thousands of dialects, if its people choose to speak one language and have one currency? A dream I would say. A utopia some critics may argue. Let’s have that dream! For many years Africa has been Known as the cradle of Humanity. First it was Charles Darwin who suggests in 1871 in a book that Africa may be the birthplace of humankind. What was a speculation in 1871 becomes strongly true in 1925 when Raymond Dart, an Australian anatomist who worked at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, publishes in the journal Nature his findings after digging into a rock delivered at his house. He coined the term “Australopithecus africanus” after studying the fossil discovered in 1924. Australopithecus africanus is the human ancestor so far although David R. Begun, a professor at the University of Toronto (Canada) challenged that... Read more