African Advisory Council Cup Final: Gambia beat Benin 3 – 0

The final of the African Advisory Council Cup was played on Saturday, May 18, 2024, in New York at Macomb Dam Park in the Bronx. The kickoff of the competition started on May 4 with 16 teams. The final was on Saturday, May 17, 2024, and   pitted the Gambia team against Benin. The Gambians wore white jerseys and the Beninese yellow. It is 4:38 p.m. when the referee kicks off.  From the start of the game, the Gambians were more decisive.  They missed their first goal opportunity in the 25th minute.  The Beninese who were nonchalant woke up after the Gambians missed to score a goal. Four minutes later they also missed an opportunity to score the very first goal of the game.  The referee blows the whistle for half-time. Gambia 0 – Benin 0. When the game restarted, the Gambians were more decisive and showed a fierce desire... Read more

Spring Jobs Will Lead to a Summer of Opportunity

New York City is in the middle of an economic boom, breaking record after record when it comes to creating jobs and opportunity. Just last week, we celebrated another record high for private-sector jobs in our city, with unemployment falling to 4.8 percent. There is also good news on the equity front, with Black unemployment at its lowest point in half a decade, having decreased by 26 percent since the start of 2022. There is no question: our economy is strong. But we are committed to building on our success and expanding the scope of opportunity for all. That is why we are announcing our “Spring Jobs Sprint,” an all-out effort to connect New Yorkers with jobs. We are not waiting around — we are bringing the jobs to the people. Every month, we host hiring halls to bring both public- and private-sector job opportunities to neighborhoods across the five boroughs.... Read more

MAYOR ADAMS COMPLETES ROLLOUT OF COMPOSTING IN ALL NEW YORK CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

New York City Mayor Eric Adams, New York City Department of Education (DOE) Chancellor David C. Banks, and New York City Department of Sanitation (DSNY) Commissioner Jessica Tisch today announced that the Adams administration has completed its expansion of composting to every single New York City public school, three months ahead of schedule. That means that all New York City public schools are now composting their food waste — putting their orange peels, uneaten pizza crusts, compostable food trays, and more to beneficial use for the city and for the planet, helping gardens grow, and creating power through renewable energy here in the New York City area.  “Composting is a win-win-win — it keeps waste out of landfills, greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere, and rats out of our communities,” said Mayor Adams. “We’re proud to bring our nation-leading composting program to all of our city’s public schools ahead of schedule,... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Scoring a Goal for Affordable Housing

In November 2022, our administration announced a historic once-in-a-generation transformation of the Willets Points neighborhood in Queens. This neighborhood, which was once called the “Valley of Ashes” and known for its junkyards, is now being transformed into a vibrant neighborhood with 2,500 new all-affordable homes — the largest all-affordable housing project in the city over the last 40 years — a  new school, 150,000 square feet of new open public space, retail space, a hotel, and the city’s first-ever soccer-specific stadium that will be home to, and privately financed by, the New York City Football Club. With the City Council’s vote to approve phase 2 of the development, we are one major step closer to victory for all New Yorkers. The Willets Point project represents the future of our city, a future in which all New Yorkers can afford to live in a safe apartment that is close to a... Read more

Christelle N. Onwu, the CEO and Founder of Express Connexion, the new firm with brand – new services

Christelle N. Onwu is the CEO and Founder of Express Connexion, a new firm that was created in 2023 and that provides several services. Ms. Onwu has been known as a Human Rights advocate not only in the African community in New York but also in other communities. Although Express Connexion is not practically focus on Human rights, Ms. Onwu said she is still a Human Rights advocate at heart. Let’s meet Ms. Onwu and her organization. African Journal (A J):  Please introduce yourself to our readers who do not know you. Christelle N. Onwu (C N O): My name is Christelle N. Onwu, CEO and Founder of Express Connexion. I have been recognized by City & State's NYC 40 Under 40 Rising Star class of 2021, The Assembly of the State of New York, and the New York City Council. Christelle is a 2021 Council on Urban Professional fellow, Coro... Read more

MAYOR ADAMS, NYPD COMMISSIONER CABAN TO PILOT NEW TECHNOLOGY, ANNOUNCE ADDITIONAL CLINICIANS TO BE DEPLOYED IN SUBWAYS

 New York City Mayor Eric Adams and New York City Police Department (NYPD) Commissioner Edward A. Caban today announced efforts being taken to make the Metropolitan Transit Authority’s (MTA) subway system safer by investing in new technology to detect firearms, as well as invest in more clinicians that will help those suffering from severe mental illness in the nation’s largest subway system. The city is exploring, and will soon begin piloting, emerging technologies designed to detect weapons carried by travelers into the transit system. In accordance with the Public Oversight of Surveillance Technology (POST) Act, the NYPD also published online its Impact and Use Policy for electromagnetic weapons detection systems, starting a mandatory 90-day waiting period before new technology can be tested and used in New York City. Additionally, Mayor Adams announced that the city will begin hiring clinicians to support the expansion of the Subway Co-Response Outreach Teams (SCOUT),... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Yes to Housing in God’s Backyard

When we came into office, we had a clear mission: protect public safety, rebuild our economy as quickly as possible, and make our city more livable for everyday New Yorkers. The key to livability is affordable housing. It is the bedrock on which New Yorkers can build a family, build a life, or simply continue to live in the city they love. But there is currently not enough affordable housing to meet our city’s needs. The New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development’s 2023 Housing and Vacancy Survey showed that our city has a vacancy rate of 1.4 percent, the lowest this measurement has been since 1968. The only way to create more rental availability and lower prices is to build more housing.  To build more affordable housing, we must think creatively and bring every partner to the table. No partner has been more willing to answer the call than... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Giving a Raise for New York City’s Human Services Workers

When I was a child, my family lived on the edge of homelessness. My five siblings and I would go to school with black trash bags full of our clothes in case we were evicted from our apartment. I am mayor of the City of New York today because human services workers were there to support my family when we needed it most. Standing up for these workers as their mayor is not just a professional concern for me; it is personal, too. But it wasn’t just my family. Human services workers were there for all of us during the pandemic. When so many were in isolation, they were endangering their health as they worked with New Yorkers in need. Today, they are helping our neighbors get mental health care, connecting our homeless brothers and sisters with housing, running community centers across the five boroughs, caring for asylum seekers, and... Read more

MAYOR ADAMS DEMANDS WATER BILL DODGERS TO PAY DEBT OR RISK LOSING WATER ACCESS

 New York City Mayor Eric Adams and New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Rohit T. Aggarwala today announced that the city has initiated the next phase of its expanded collection enforcement actions against approximately 2,400 chronically-delinquent water service accounts that owe the city a total of $102 million. As part of the effort, DEP will send out ‘Water Shutoff Notices’ to these customers, informing them that water service to their property could be shut off unless the entire owed amount is paid or they enter into a payment agreement within the next 15 days. This enforcement action is targeted towards commercial properties, including hotels, office buildings, and retail spaces, as well as one-to-three family homes that have not responded to any of DEP’s extensive outreach efforts over the past year. Earlier this year, DEP sent out ‘Water Shutoff Warning’ letters, which resulted in the agency recouping more than... Read more

Guinean Community of America: The IEC sets the date for elections for the renewal of the members of the organization

The Guinean Community of America (GUICA) is actively preparing for the renewal of the members of the organization, whose term is coming to an end.  The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) under the chairmanship of Mory Kouyate held its first meeting on March 6, 2024, in order to decide on a timetable for the holding of these elections. Here are some important dates: The census begins on April 1, 2024, and ends on April 30, 2024. The deadline for the submission of candidacies and the electoral deposit are set for May 2, 2024. The election date is set for June 2, 2024. Debates are scheduled for May 12, 2024, May 19, 2024, and May 26, 2024. In case there is a second round, the date will be two weeks after the announcement of the results on June 16, 2024. The President of the Independent Electoral Commission Mory Kouyate thanked the Guinean... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Building a City of Opportunity

As I often say, we live in a city of 8.3 million people — and 35 million opinions. But one thing all New Yorkers can agree on is that people come to our city to make it.  They come here to work, build lives, and fulfill the American Dream. And the Adams administration is committed to creating the conditions for that dream to flourish. This means doing everything we can to protect public safety, rebuild our economy, and make all five boroughs more livable for all New Yorkers.  As part of our ongoing efforts, we have developed “City of Yes for Economic Opportunity” — a set of 18 zoning changes that will help businesses find space and grow, support entrepreneurs and freelancers, boost growing industries, and make our streetscapes more vibrant. For far too long, outdated regulations have made it difficult for small businesses in our city to flourish. These regulations,... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Building a legal, equitable cannabis industry that works for us all

When we came to office two years ago, we had a clear vision: protect public safety, revitalize the economy, and make this city more livable for hardworking New Yorkers. And building a legal, equitable cannabis industry is part of every part of that vision. Legal cannabis remains the right choice for New York City. This budding, emerging industry offers a once-in-a-generation chance for those disproportionately impacted by the so-called ‘War on Drugs’ to build wealth, especially in our Black and Brown communities. For too long, these communities faced high rates of drug-related incarceration and were denied economic opportunities. But thanks to the equitable, legal cannabis industry, they have a chance to get in on the industry from the ground up. We know, however, that it’s not enough to just support the opening of new legal cannabis shops — we must have Albany grant local authorities the power to close down the illegal operators... Read more

Mohammed Mardah is running again as assemblyman for the 77th assembly district in the Bronx, and The African Journal has endorsed him: Mr. Mardha is speaking openly

             After he lost the race to be the assemblyman for the 77th assembly district in the Bronx, Mohammed Mardah is running again in June 2024 for the same seat. The African Journal is endorsing Mr. Mardha. In the interview we have with him, he explains the reason why he is running and speaks a little bit about his vision for the African community. In a commentary we also explain why we endorse Mr. Mardha. Let's find out. The African Journal: After assemblywoman Latoya Joyner announced in January 2024 her resignation as assemblywoman for the 77th assembly district in the Bronx, you have decided to run as assemblyman in the election for the newly opened 77th Assembly District. This is great news for the African community. Many people know you in the African community in New York in general, and in the Bronx in particular. Please introduce yourself to those... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Making it Easier for Working-Class New Yorkers to File Their Taxes and Put Money Back Into Their Pockets

New York City was built on the backs of working-class New Yorkers; people like my mother, Dorothy Mae Adams, a single mother who worked multiple jobs to support my five siblings and myself. She sacrificed everything for us, and I know that there are thousands of New Yorkers doing the same today in our city for their families. Those are the people we have been fighting for since day one of this administration. We’ve been clear that our mission has been to deliver those working-class New Yorkers a city that protects public safety, revitalizes the economy, and is more livable. We’ve made our city safer, created 270,000 private-sector jobs, set a first-of-its-kind minimum wage for deliveristas, and worked with our brothers and sisters in labor to get them the pay and benefits they deserve. We have broken affordable housing records — financing the most affordable homes in city history and connecting more... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Social Media and Youth Mental Health

New York City has always been a hub for technology and innovation. And while technology has helped create jobs, opportunities, and prosperity, it has also the potential to cause new dangers, especially when it comes to social media and the mental health of our children.  Our administration came into office two years ago with a mission to protect public safety, and protecting our young people’s mental health is very much a part of that agenda. That is why, last week — along with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York City Health + Hospitals, and the New York City Department of Education — we filed a lawsuit against the companies that own and operate five social media companies in an effort to hold these companies accountable for role they have played in fueling a mental health crisis among our young people. Our most recent data found... Read more

M23: Four things you should know about the rebel group’s campaign in Rwanda-DRC conflict

Fighting between the Democratic Republic of Congo’s national army and the rebel group M23 has displaced thousands of people in the eastern border city of Goma. Formed 10 years ago, the Rwanda-backed Mouvement du 23 Mars (M23) soon made its first mark when it briefly occupied Goma, a city of 1 million today. An African-led effort resulted in a ceasefire and M23’s demobilisation – until the resumption of hostilities in 2021. Delphin Ntanyoma sets out the four things you should know about the rebel insurgency, which threatens regional stability. 1. What is the background to M23’s insurgency in eastern DRC? The current force is what’s left of the original M23 Movement formed in April 2012. M23 was an offspring of the National Congress for the Defence of the People, better known by its French acronym CNDP, a rebel group which fought the DRC government between 2006 and 2009. Both groups draw on a claim that the Congolese Tutsi and other ethnic communities... Read more

Community Op-Ed: What We Need From Albany

New York City is all about what is possible. It’s a place where you can start a business, raise a family, and make a difference. Our administration came into office with the aim of keeping that American Dream alive by protecting public safety, rebuilding our economy, and making our city more livable for everyday New Yorkers. I went to our state capital last week with the goal of furthering that vision. We laid out an agenda to advance working-class families by extending mayoral accountability of our public schools for four years, granting the city the authority to shut down illegal smoke shops, and creating more affordable housing. Finally, we outlined the city’s fiscal challenges, including state funding for asylum seekers and increasing New York City’s debt limit. New York City public schools are leading the way in New York state and across the nation because of mayoral accountability. Thanks to mayoral... Read more

AT ANNUAL INTERFAITH BREAKFAST, MAYOR ADAMS, FAITH LEADERS LAUNCH CITYWIDE CLERGY COLLECTIVE TO PREVENT GUN VIOLENCE

NEW YORK — New York City Mayor Eric Adams and a coalition of multifaith leaders from across the city today launched the Citywide Clergy Collective, a group of 272 faith leaders committed to preventing gun violence in New York City, at the administration’s annual interfaith breakfast. Using a $1.5 million grant from the New York State Department of Criminal Justice, Citywide Clergy Collective members will deliver resources, direct services, and community-building programs to all New Yorkers in all five boroughs as they respond to the needs and traumas that gun violence creates. The programs and services will be run by local faith leaders across the city, with assistance from the New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD), Office of Neighborhood Safety, Office of Faith-Based and Community Partnerships, and New York City Police Department (NYPD).   “Public safety is the prerequisite to prosperity, and it takes all of us to deliver a safe city,” said Mayor Adams. “That’s why we are bringing together a multidenominational coalition of hundreds... Read more

“They Devour” an African movie that tells Africans ‘stories from Gambia

The   premiere of a new movie “They Devour,” took place on January 21, 2024, at Regal Cinema Theater in Manhattan. They were several moviegoers who converged to Regal Cinema Theater that Sunday evening to delight “They Devour,” a movie that tells a story, an African migrant ‘story. A mother at age 15 decided to leave her lovely African country ( Gambia ) to experience a new life in another country where nobody know here. The story takes place in New York where the mother starts her new life. She meets people in various places by day and by night:  restaurants, stores, streets, etc.  And every place tells its own story that becomes her story. We can see her falling in love for example with a man in a restaurant. Sometimes her relationship with some other people turns to a fight as she squeezed a collar of a young man. [caption... Read more

WHAT THEY’RE SAYING: NEW YORK LEADERS CONTINUE TO VOICE OPPOSITION TO CITY COUNCIL BILL THAT COULD MAKE NYC STREETS LESS SAFE

Following today’s veto on City Council bill Intro. 586-A — which could make New York City less safe by forcing New York City Police Department (NYPD) officers to spend more time filling out reports after Level 1 interactions with the public instead of patrolling the street and keeping the public safe — faith leaders, community advocates, business organizations, district attorneys, law enforcement professionals, and everyday New Yorkers voiced their opposition to the bill. Here is what New York leaders are saying: “The city’s employers want to see faster police response and greater availability to deal with criminal and quality of life issues,” said Kathy Wylde, president and CEO, Partnership for New York City. “As written, this legislation does the opposite. It should be amended to eliminate onerous reporting requirements for police encounters on non-criminal matters.” “The City Council’s objective to increase transparency in policing and ensure we never return to the days of mass... Read more

MAYOR ADAMS ANNOUNCES RECORD NUMBER OF AFFORDABLE HOMES CREATED IN 2023, MAKES URGENT CASE FOR ALBANY ACTION AS PRIVATE CONSTRUCTION SLOWS

New York City Mayor Eric Adams today announced that his administration has once again broken records for producing much-needed affordable housing amid a severe housing shortage in the five boroughs. As private construction activity slows following the expiration of a critical affordable housing creation tool, Mayor Adams reiterated an urgent call for state lawmakers in Albany to partner with New York Governor Kathy Hochul and provide the city with critical tools — including a new affordable housing tax incentive, a pathway to make basement and cellar apartments safe and legal, a tax incentive to turn empty office buildings into affordable homes, and the lifting of a cap on density for new construction — to create the new housing New Yorkers need.    “When we came into office two years ago, we had a mission: protect public safety, revitalize the economy, and make this city more livable for hardworking New Yorkers, and making... Read more

Community Op-Ed—Honoring Dr. King’s Legacy by Fighting for Fair Housing

This week, we celebrate the life of one of our greatest American leaders, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This is a moment to honor his accomplishments, but it’s also an opportunity to reflect on what he fought for and to carry his legacy forward. We must find new strength to continue his work by breaking down barriers and building true equality — here in New York City, and all across this nation. That means fighting for fair housing and building a city where working people can afford to stay and thrive. This is one of the major issues that Dr. King fought for during his lifetime and it remains urgent in 2024.  Many forget that Dr. King called out discriminatory practices by landlords and realtors who were keeping Black Americans out of certain neighborhoods. He also advocated for the Fair Housing Act to make those discriminatory practices illegal. This landmark legislation was finally passed... Read more

Community Op-Ed—The Safest Big City in America

Since day one, our administration has been clear about our vision for the five boroughs — creating a city that is safer, more economically viable, and more livable for the 8.3 million hardworking New Yorkers who call the greatest city in the world home. I always say that “public safety is the prerequisite to prosperity.” That’s why, since coming into office 24 months ago, we’ve been dedicated to making sure New Yorkers are safer and feel safer. Two years later, the results are in. Crime has gone down across the city and jobs have gone up. We have recovered all of the nearly 1 million private-sector jobs we lost during the pandemic, and New York remains the economic engine of this nation. When we came into office in January 2022, the city was emerging from the devastating effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, and, in just one week, an 11-month-old baby... Read more

Community Op-Ed—Keeping Nightlife Safe in New York City

New York City is the city that never sleeps. We are a 24-hour city that is the nightlife capital of the world. And we remain the safest big city in America. When I came into office two years ago, we had a mission: Protect public safety, revitalize the economy, and make this city more livable for hardworking New Yorkers. Our bars, restaurants, music venues, and nightclubs employ workers across the city and are home to every level of our live performance industry. But across the five boroughs, local residents often deal with noise, trash, and crime from nightlife. Complaints can lead to unannounced inspections that shutter nightlife businesses, sometimes permanently. Just because our nightlife establishments throw a great party, residents and businesses should not be stuck with a hangover the next day. We want to protect public safety, while keeping our nightlife businesses open. So, last week, I joined the owners of the... Read more

This Is How Algeria Sponsors Terrorism In Mali

The Algerian “Salafi Group for Preaching and Combat” in the northern region of Mali dates back to 2003 before it transformed in 2007 into the “Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb” This presence has been linked to Mukhtar bin Muhammad al-Mukhtar (an Algerian-born in 1972. He disappeared since 2013), known by his nom de guerre Khaled Abu al-Abbas, and dubbed by the Algerian press as “Al Aawar prince of the desert” or “Malboro,” a nickname he acquired as a major smuggler of cigarettes. 2003 was also marked by the kidnapping of 32 foreign tourists in the desert of Algeria by the Algerian Amari Saifi, nicknamed “Abdul-Razzaq Al-Bara,” who crossed the border towards northern Mali before their ordeal ended with their governments paying huge financial ransoms in exchange for his release. In addition to implanting Al-Qaeda, led by Mukhtar bin Muhammad al-Mukhtar in northern Mali, this operation constituted the start of the ransom method as... Read more

Ethnic and community media roundtable with New York city mayor Eric Adams who is proud of what he has done so far.

The Mayor of the City of New York Eric Adams has held on December 22, 2023, a year – end ethnic and community media roundtable to discuss topics that related to the community. As 2023 is about to eclipse and 2024’ sun is about to rise soon on the horizon, Mayor Eric Adams has found necessary to have a face-to-face meeting with reporters and journalists from community - based outlets. Immigration crisis, education, budget cut, public safety …, are some topics that were discussed. Since April 2023 New York City has started getting more and more immigrants from all over the world. “We had 150,000, 1.5 the size of Albany. A new city moved into our city,” said Mayor Adams who has been complaining that Biden’s administration and the congress are not doing enough to support New York City. However, according to the mayor “57 percent we were able to... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Pathways to Success for Our Young People

Our city’s future depends on being able to help our young people grow, fulfill their potential, and thrive in an ever-changing economy. These days, it’s rare to think about spending decades at the same job, and education is the key to developing the flexibility and resourcefulness that our youth need to succeed. Helping each child find their way and achieve the career of their dreams has been a goal of our administration since day one.  That is why we expanded our Summer Youth Employment Program and Summer Rising to serve a record number of young people and launched FutureReadyNYC with Google and Northwell Health to provide our youth with apprenticeships and opportunities in in-demand sectors, like tech and health care. And now, we are building on those initiatives with Pathways to an Inclusive Economy: An Action Plan for Young Adult Career Success. This is a more than $600 million, forward-thinking roadmap that will position 250,000 young people to... Read more

ELIGIBILITY EXPANSION TO HELP MORE NEW YORKERS ELIGIBLE FOR FAIR FARES TRANSIT DISCOUNT

New York City Mayor Eric Adams, New York City Council Speaker Adrienne Adams, and New York City Department of Social Services (DSS) Commissioner Molly Wasow Park today announced a substantial investment and an expansion of eligibility to the Fair Fares transit discount to help make the program more accessible to more New Yorkers. The Fair Fares program gives eligible New Yorkers with low incomes a 50 percent discount on buses and trains.    “New York City has recovered all of the nearly 1 million jobs lost during the pandemic, and public transit is a key component of building on that momentum and ensuring that our recovery continues to be inclusive for working families,” said Mayor Adams. “The $20 million we are investing — in partnership with the City Council — coupled with the program expansion will ensure even more New Yorkers can keep more money in their pockets while making the Fair Fares program — and our city’s... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Saying “Yes” to New Zoning, New Businesses, and New Opportunities

Last month, New York City hit an economic milestone, with more total jobs than ever before in our city’s history. Our administration is proud of the work we have done to ensure our economy has made a full recovery — and we are determined to keep working to create jobs and opportunity for all New Yorkers. Our “City of Yes for Economic Opportunity” proposal is one of the many ways we are aiming to create new pathways to prosperity. We are seeing transformative changes in how we live and work, and our city’s rules and regulations must adapt to these new realities — especially when it comes to antiquated zoning laws from decades ago. Rules that made sense in the days of the rotary telephone are getting in the way of doing business in the age of the smartphone. We recently kicked off the public review process for this ambitious... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Helping New Yorkers live longer

When we came into office, we promised that we would ensure that our prosperity would be felt across the five boroughs. And the health of our people is key to that prosperity. But despite coming out of a once-in-a-century pandemic, life expectancy in this city has not fully recovered. Between 2019 and 2020, overall life expectancy in New York City fell to 78 years. So, it is time we gave New Yorkers some extra life. That is why we recently launched HealthyNYC, our ambitious plan to extend and improve the lifespan of all New Yorkers to 83 years by 2030. HealthyNYC sets clear goals to reduce the greatest drivers of premature death, including chronic and diet-related diseases, overdose, suicide, maternal mortality, violence, and COVID-19. Pill boxes, injections, and doctor's appointments should not define the lives of New Yorkers — we can and we must invest in helping all New Yorkers... Read more

The Mayor Eric Adams press conference addressed subjects related to his phones ‘ seizure by the FBI, the war in Israel, the education…

The Mayor of New York Eric Adams has held on November 11, 2023, a press conference to speak about  “ many things” he and his team are facing right now in the city. The war between Israel and Hamas, the suspension of Amtrak train, the education, and the FBI agents ‘ raid on the home of the New York City mayor’s chief fundraiser , 25 -  year – old Brianna Suggs as well, are subjects that were discussed. “ Something that’s really impacted me now is what’s happening on our streets every day. The incident that played out in Israel has really impacted this city. This is an international city and things that happen across the globe, they play out in the City of New York, even during the war in Ukraine,” said mayor Eric Adams as he talked about Israel war against Hamas. “ Since October 7th terrorist attacks,... Read more

MAYOR ADAMS LEADS JEWISH, MUSLIM, AND CHRISTIAN FAITH AND COMMUNITY LEADERS IN DISCUSSION TO TACKLE HATE ACROSS FIVE BOROUGHS

New York City Mayor Eric Adams yesterday convened a meeting with Jewish, Muslim, and Christian faith and community leaders in the wake of a recent spike in hate crimes across both the Jewish and Muslim communities since October 7, 2023 — when Hamas launched a terrorist attack on Israeli civilians. In the five weeks since the attacks, tensions have risen across NewYork City and the rest of the globe, unfortunately leading to a rise in hate crimes in certain communities. Mayor Adams brought these leaders together yesterday to discuss how to fight hate within the five boroughs and how New Yorkers can work together to create a safer, more accepting New York. “There is no place for hate in our city and we need all of our houses of worship to come together in this moment and talk about how we bring light into the darkness that we are all... Read more

MAYOR ADAMS, DOT COMMISSIONER RODRIGUEZ, LYFT ANNOUNCE EXPANSION, IMPROVEMENTS TO CITI BIKE SYSTEM AS RIDERSHIP REACHES RECORD HIGHS

New York City Mayor Eric Adams, New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) Commissioner Ydanis Rodriguez, and Lyft today unveiled plans to expand and improve the Citi Bike system to meet ridership demand and growth and to promote cycling and micromobility. By the end of next year, Citi Bike will double its electric bike fleet and pilot at least two electrified charging/docking stations, with plans to electrify 20 percent of stations in the coming years. Citi Bike will also introduce new price caps to its e-bike pricing model, and has already added 2,800 classic bikes and replaced 2,200 existing bikes as a part of its Phase 3 expansion.  Since its launch 10 years ago, Citi Bike has become a ubiquitous part of the fabric of New York City, and now is the largest bike share program in the nation and the fastest-growing transportation network in the city’s history with 200 million... Read more

BurkinaBe In Action Inc., “ My passion is to bring community together,” said Chairwoman Alizeta Diallo

BurkinaBe In Action, Inc. in partnership with Association des Burkinabe de New Jersey,   has brought together in October 29,2023 in New Jersey community groups and panelists from different agencies such as immigration, and labor department. The event called “cultural bridges: navigating legal /immigration services together ,” was an opportunity to discuss issues related to immigration, jobs, and family with several attorneys. [caption id="attachment_7696" align="alignleft" width="300"] Alizeta Diallo chairwoman of BurkinaBe In Action[/caption] “My passion is to be able to bring people together and to offer programs to community,” said Alizeta Diallo the founder and the chairwoman of “BurkinaBe In Action, Inc.” a nonprofit organization. Six attorneys were available to talk about themes such as family  and humanitarian immigration, child and delinquency cases, labor and unions. The audience has a chance to ask questions, and to discuss in private with attorneys. Dean Dafis the Maplewood mayor has welcomed the event and... Read more

Community Op-Ed: New Yorkers are Spreading the Love. Here’s how you can get involved

We all love New York City. And this year, New Yorkers have been showing their love by lending a helping hand as part of our Spread Love campaign. Since March, nearly 30,000 New Yorkers have given more than 235,000 hours of their time to help out our neighbors in need. Thanks in no small part to the sacrifices of volunteers, our city is back better than ever. Jobs are at an all-time high and crime is down. We overcame the darkest days of the pandemic because of the selfless work of everyday volunteers. But so many of our neighbors — especially young people, families, and older adults — still need our help. Imagine what would happen if every New Yorker committed just one hour a week to an act of service. The result would be transformative.  There are so many opportunities to get involved. It can be as simple as... Read more

Community Op-Ed: Investing in clean, green public space for all New Yorkers

 So much of New York City’s history was about changing the natural environment – cutting it down, clearing it out, paving it over. But going forward, we know that the future is about working with nature, building a greener, cleaner, safer city for all. From parks and playgrounds to streets, sidewalks, bike lanes and even beaches, our Administration is committed to investing in the quality and cleanliness of our public spaces all across the five boroughs. This past week, we announced two major initiatives that will transform what it feels like be outside in New York City: A historic expansion of our greenway network, and an ambitious citywide trash containerization effort that will revolutionize the way we keep our streets clean. For far too long, New Yorkers in the outer boroughs have not had the same level of access to bike lanes and greenways that people in Manhattan have, and... Read more

MAYOR ADAMS, GOVERNOR HOCHUL, MTA LAUNCH “SUBWAY SURFING KILLS – RIDE INSIDE, STAY ALIVE” PUBLIC INFORMATION CAMPAIGN

 New York City Mayor Eric Adams, New York Governor Kathy Hochul, and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) today unveiled “Subway Surfing Kills – Ride Inside, Stay Alive” — a new comprehensive, multi-channel public information campaign in partnership with the New York City Department of Education (DOE), the New York City Police Department (NYPD), and the New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD). The new campaign centers around, is designed for, and was created by New York City teenagers — putting the youth voice front and center in a peer-to-peer effort to deter this dangerous behavior among young people.  “Each subway surfing death takes tragically strips young New Yorkers of promising futures said Mayor Adams. “We cannot endure another tragedy on our trains. That’s why we are partnering with the MTA on an innovative campaign to raise awareness, and we have recruited true social media experts to help lead... Read more

Kamou Malo: Former police chief who has brought hope to Burkina Faso as a football coach

What would make one quit the chance of being a police commissioner to become a football coach? For 59-year-old Kamou Malo, passion was his only driving force. Kamou Malo gave up the police commissioner's exam in Burkina Faso for a coaching diploma and now here he is in the semi-final of the African Cup on Wednesday (20:00) against Senegal, with the prestige of the local coach. "It was a difficult choice. I had to take the competitive examination for commissioner, the dates overlapped," Kamou Malo, told AFP. "I was a police officer in Koudougou, where I also coached ASEC (Association Sportive des Employés et Commerçants) in the first division, then I had the opportunity to go to Germany for a training course to get a coaching license," said the coach who guided the "Stallions" to the last four of AFCON. Born in Fing in 1962, not far from Bobo-Dioulasso, he... Read more

Biden’s declaration: America’s democracy ‘is rising anew’

President Joe Biden declared that “America is rising anew” as he called for an expansion of federal programs to drive the economy past the coronavirus pandemic and broadly extend the social safety net on a scale not seen in decades. Biden’s nationally televised address to Congress, his first, raised the stakes for his ability to sell his plans to voters of both parties, even if Republican lawmakers prove resistant. The Democratic president is following Wednesday night’s speech by pushing his plans in person, beginning in Georgia on Thursday and then on to Pennsylvania and Virginia in the days ahead. In the address, Biden pointed optimistically to the nation’s emergence from the coronavirus scourge as a moment for America to prove that its democracy can still work and maintain primacy in the world. Speaking in highly personal terms while demanding massive structural changes, the president marked his first 100 days in office by... Read more

A rally to end the violence against Black women: electoral officials, clergy, community leaders, and Harlem residents stand together

A rally to call for justice, and to end the violence against Black women has  brought together on January 30th 2021, New York City  electoral officials, clergy,  community leaders, and Harlem residents in Harlem as the police is actively searching for three men who assaulted a 31 – year – old mother. The young woman whose name has not been revealed was bitten, beaten, spit on, and robbed on Monday January 18, 2021 on West 128th street by three assailants upon leaving a liquor store on West 128th street. “We will come together and bring those who commit this crime to justice,” said New York State Senator Brian A. Benjamin who wondered why the assailants are still on the loose. He has promised that “we will keep doing anything to bring these guys to justice.” “We feel what you feel,” said Eric Adams the Brooklyn Borough President as he spoke... Read more

New York City public schools are giving free internet-enabled iPads to students

New York City public schools will be continuing academic instruction through Remote Learning for the rest of the school year. To keep students connected and able to learn from home, the DOE is lending internet-enabled iPads to students who are in need of a device. Families that want to request a device should call DOE at 718-935-5100 and choose Option 5 on the menu for help getting a device with internet connection. Or they can fill out the Remote Learning Device Request form at https://coronavirus.schools.nyc/RemoteLearningDevices. DOE will use the contact information provided on the form to reach out to the family to schedule delivery of the device. Everyone who fills out a request form online, with a staff member, or over the phone, will be sent follow up emails and texts. Priority will be given to students most in need. All devices are granted on a temporary basis and will later need to... Read more

The Director General  of World Health Organization condemns the remarks of the French racist doctors

The Director-General  of World Health Organization ( WHO)  Dr. Tedros Adhanom hold this morning a press conference regarding Covid – 19 and The African Journal was part of that. Here is a very important  quote from Dr. Tedros who condemns the remarks made by two French scientists ( Jean-Paul Mira and  Camille Locht )  who said that vaccine against covid – 19 should be tested in Africa. “ On the vaccine issue , there was a comment last week from some couple of scientists who said the testing ground for the new vaccine would be in Africa. To be honest, I was so appalled . It was a time when I said when we need solidarity this kind  of racist remarks actually will not help. It goes against the solidarity. Africa cannot and will be not a testing ground four any vaccine. We will follow all the rules to test... Read more

Capital Preparatory Bronx Charter School To Open In August

A new school in the Bronx seeks to hire teachers for the upcoming school year as it prepares to open its door for children. Capital Preparatory Bronx Charter School will begin its academic year in August 2020 with 6th and 7th graders, with the lottery deadline for parents to apply set for April 1st.  “We can design a school that is so acutely aligned to our community’s needs,” said Dr. Steve Perry, explaining how important the institution is. A school of such high stature needs great teachers.  Isaiah Brown, the Founding Principal for the Capital Prep, refers to their educators as illuminators stating, “illuminators spark interest in the minds of young persons and therefore inspire them to do great things.” The school is looking for 10 illuminators and administrators for all subjects. Being bilingual in foreign languages such as Arabic, French, Spanish, and Bengali, is a huge plus. “One of... Read more

Book Review: Red Zone: Cuba and the Battle Against Ebola in West Africa

Coming soon from Pathfinder Press Advance book information announcement Publication date: February 10, 2020 Red Zone: Cuba and the Battle Against Ebola in West Africa Author: Enrique Ubieta Gomez Publisher: Pathfinder Press www.pathfinderpress.com orders@pathfinderpress.com Languages: English; Spanish   ISBN: 978- 1- 60488-114-1 (English)            978-1-60488-113-4 (Spanish) LCCN: 2019955382(English)             2019953442( Spanish)         Page count: 278 Format: Trade paper Price: US$17.00 Book description : “Just as the Cuban combatants in Angola set an example that can never be erased, the heroic actions of Cuba’s army of white coats will occupy a place of honor.” FIDEL CASTRO, OCTOBER 2014 In 2014 three West African countries were hit by the largest epidemic on record of the deadly Ebola virus. In response to an international call for help, Cuba’s revolutionary socialist government provided what was needed most – and what no other country even tried to deliver. In a matter of weeks, more than... Read more

What is the role of women in new technologies?

The second edition of the Women in Business leadership meeting organized by the Africa CEO Forum kicked off on Monday. For the next two days, nearly 250 participants from 31 countries will discuss innovation and the role of women in new technologies. A highly dynamic sector with the development of artificial intelligence… which women must seize, explains Hajer Khader Bizri, deputy director of the Women in Business Initiative.  Women are under-represented in scientific fields and this poses a real problem because afterwards we have what is called a bias in innovation and we end up with biased innovations because they are tested and thought of only by men. So there is really this challenge of having more women who create algorithms, who are in the scientific fields so that the products and services that companies put on the market are adapted to the whole of humanity, said Hajer Khader Bizri, Deputy Director,... Read more

Burkinabe scientists attempt killing mosquitoes with spider venom

 Burkinabe scientists in one of the country’s village plagued by malarial mosquitoes, are conducting an experiment to test whether a fungus genetically-engineered to produce a toxin found in spider venom can provide a breakthrough in the worldwide fight against malaria, a deadly mosquito-borne disease that killed an estimated 435,000 people in 2017, according to the World Health Organization. “If we can find a solution against this disease which killed my child, other people we will thank god. They should do everything to eradicate this disease,” said Dramane Ouedraogo, a dedicated father that has visited his son’s grave every day since the two-year-old died of malaria, n the village of Soumousso. Brian Lovett, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Maryland leading the project said the idea is to target the mosquitoes using the natural characteristics of the fungus and spider venom.  The scientists have engineered the DNA of the Metarhizium pingshaense fungus... Read more

Trump Administration to LGBT Couples: Your ‘Out of Wedlock’ Kids Aren’t Citizens

Children of U.S. citizens are falling victim to a policy that de-recognizes their parents’ marriage—and strips them of their birthright citizenship No parent can ever be fully prepared for the arrival of a new baby. But when Roee and Adiel Kiviti brought home their newborn daughter Kessem two months ago, they figured that they were as ready as they could be. After all, they’d gone through the same process two years earlier with their son Lev, who, like Kessem, was born with the help of an egg donor and a gestational surrogate in Canada. “It was as straightforward as one can imagine,” Roee told The Daily Beast, recalling the ease of bringing Lev home in late 2016, the infant’s newly printed Canadian passport in hand, soon to be supplanted by an American one. But this February, when Kessem’s fathers contacted the U.S. consulate in Calgary to obtain a Consular Report... Read more

Boukary Sawadogo signed copies of his book, “African Film Studies: An Introduction” in New York

“African Film Studies: An Introduction”, the book, which is presented deeply the African cinema was launched in December 4, 2018 at Schomburg Center, in Harlem in a room that was became small as many people came to support the author, and understand better what African cinema is about. “The book is divided into seven chapters, which are themselves organized under three main parts: history, aesthetics, and criticism of African cinema,” said Boukary Sawadogo who authors the book and who is an assistant professor of cinema studies at City University of New York (City College). Mr. Sawadogo was praised by Dr. Jerry W. Carlson, professor and chair of Department of Media & Communication Arts, and who said he is the one the Department was looking for. He also said that Mr. Sawadogo has his full support. Focusing his speech on the African cinema, Mr. Sawadogo said that “the understanding and appreciation... Read more

Africa Investment Forum exceeds expectations, participants agree

The Africa Investment Forum (www.AfricaInvestmentForum.com) ended on a high note with the closing panel comprising heads of Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) unanimously lauding the unique initiative, calling it an exceptional gathering that “exceeded all expectations.” President of the African Development Bank (www.AfDB.org), Akinwumi Adesina told the more than 1,000 delegates, “The needle is shifting, pointing to the right direction, pointing to Africa. I am thankful for the investors, I am thankful for the confidence they have in Africa. Africa has grown up. Africa is not going to be developed by aid. It will be developed by investment and I think you are beginning to see it.¨ Participants from DFIs, institutional investors, sovereign wealth, equity and private sector CEOs from across the continent congregated in Johannesburg, South Africa to attend the first ever transaction-based Forum on the continent. At midday Friday, of 61 transactions valued at US$40.4 billion tabled for discussions... Read more

Le mariage est un contrat

Si vous êtes mariés sous un régime de biens communs ou si vous n’êtes pas encore mariés et que vous voulez vous mettre la corde au cou, il y a sans nul doute une facette de cet engagement que vous pouvez ignorer. A travers ces lignes Bérenger Ouédraogo nous en dit plus. Un contrat est une convention (c’est-à-dire on s’entend) par laquelle on s’engage à faire ou à ne pas faire quelque chose.  Dans le cas du mariage, on parle plus souvent d'alliance, d'où la bague d'alliance. Ce contrat doit être bilatéral, c’est-à-dire, les contractants s’engagent réciproquement, les uns envers les autres et de façon explicite pour éviter les suppositions. Les catholiques parlent de sacrement (qui veut dire « signe »), mais cela n’annule pas le caractère contractuel du mariage. Le contrat se vérifie et trouve sa véracité dans le consentement matrimonial libre des conjoints. Le Catéchisme de l’Église Catholique en son... Read more

Interview: “Prof Boukary Sawadogo is talking about his new and second book

By : Bazona Barnabé Bado

Do you like African cinema, or do you want to know better about it? You have the good news: “African Film Studies: An Introduction” is a book that will allow you to explore and understand Africa through the lenses of African filmmakers. Dr. Boukary Sawadogo the author of that new book through this interview is talking about the book he took three years to write.  African Film Studies: An Introduction is the title of your new book and the second one you’ve written. Yes, it was published by Routledge in late September 2018. My first book, Les Cinémas francophones ouest-africains, 1990-2005, was published by Harmattan in 2013. Why did you decide to write a book that deals specifically with African film? I realized there is a great need for a teaching and learning resource for African cinema. There are plenty of scholarly books on African cinema but almost no textbooks... Read more

L’ÂME SŒUR : MYTHE OU RÉALITÉ?

Aujourd’hui dans notre rubrique « Famille » Wendlassida A. Bérenger Ouédraogo qui,  dans son article sur le choix du conjoint, nous parle de « l’âme sœur ». Il s’interroge : l’âme sœur est – il un mythe ou une réalité ? A vous de décider. Très souvent, des gens ont de la peine à se trouver et à se choisir un conjoint. L’on dit communément son âme sœur ou sa moitié. Ce peut être un mythe ou une réalité. De ces deux points de vue dépend notre attitude.           L’âme sœur vue comme un mythe. Vous allez rechercher le prince charmant, l’homme ou la femme idéal(e) qui serait uniquement créé pour vous et serait quelque part en attente d’être retrouvé(e). Selon le mythe, il existerait un être, juste pour vous, dont vous allez tomber amoureux instantanément. La théorie de l’âme sœur se trouve dans « le Bouquet de Platon ». Selon Platon, les êtres humains, à... Read more

A bloodless malaria test by a young Ugandan inventor won Africa’s top engineering prize  

  The $33,000 Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation has been awardedto a 24-year old Ugandan engineer for his invention of a bloodless malaria test. Before now, small blood samples taken from suspected patients in hospitals or pharmacies were used to test for malaria but with Matibabu, the device developed by Brian Gitta and his team, there is no need for pricking. When a person is infected, the malaria parasite takes over a vacuole of the red blood cells and significantly remodels it. For Matibabu to work, it is clipped onto a person’s finger and using light and magnetism, a red beam of light scans the finger for changes in colour, shape and concentration of the red blood cells. A result is produced within a minute and sent to a mobile phone linked to the device. Matibabu (Swahili for ‘treatment’) is low cost, reusable and because the procedure is non-invasive, does not require specialist training. Malaria alone... Read more

Imagine Africa with one language, and one currency !

By : Barnabé Bazona Bado

How powerful would be Africa, the continent of 54 countries, and thousands of dialects, if its people choose to speak one language and have one currency? A dream I would say. A utopia some critics may argue. Let’s have that dream! For many years Africa has been Known as the cradle of Humanity. First it was Charles Darwin who suggests in 1871 in a book that Africa may be the birthplace of humankind. What was a speculation in 1871 becomes strongly true in 1925 when Raymond Dart, an Australian anatomist who worked at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, publishes in the journal Nature his findings after digging into a rock delivered at his house. He coined the term “Australopithecus africanus” after studying the fossil discovered in 1924. Australopithecus africanus is the human ancestor so far although David R. Begun, a professor at the University of Toronto (Canada) challenged that... Read more